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Now showing results 41-50 of 57

This article explores how statistics can be interpreted in different ways to yield different conclusions. It describes the outcome and discussion of two class activities. In the first, the results are interpreted to "show" that taking a group rather... (View More)

Keywords: Probability; Mean; Average
Audience: Middle school
Materials Cost: Free

This example explains how contour mapping teaches both estimation and spatial visualization skills. To have experience visualizing 3-dimensional fields from a 2-dimensional map helps students throughout their mathematical career. This resource is... (View More)

Audience: Elementary school
Materials Cost: Free per student

Learners will measure the diameter of a solar flare by making calculations using transparency grids overlaid on images of the Sun. This is the third activity in the lesson "How Does HESSI Take a Picture?" NOTE: The HESSI mission was renamed... (View More) after Dr. Reuven Ramaty, who was the original Co-Investigator for this NASA mission, and was a pioneer in the fields of solar physics, gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear astrophysics, and cosmic rays.

Audience: Middle school
Materials Cost: Free per group of students

This is an activity about determining the distance of a solar flare from the center of the Sun's disk. Learners will use transparency grids overlaid on images of the Sun in order to calculate the distance of a solar flare, similar to a signal... (View More)

This resource introduces the concept of wind chill, the formula used to measure it and relates it to the causes of hypothermia. A simple experiment using a pie pan, sand, fan and a thermometer demonstrates this concept. The resource is from PUMAS -... (View More)

This math example explains what celestial objects a person can see with the unaided eye from the vantage points of Earth and Mars, using simple math, algebra and astronomical distance information. This resource is from PUMAS - Practical Uses of Math... (View More)

Audience: High school
Materials Cost: Free per student

In this example, students learn how to read a topographic map and understand map contours. This resource is from PUMAS - Practical Uses of Math and Science - a collection of brief examples created by scientists and engineers showing how math and... (View More)

This math problem demonstrates the concept of geometric progression, through an example of a million dollar contract between an employee and an employer. Application of the concept of geometric progression to social cause activism is addressed. This... (View More)

This resource explains how to estimate the global consequence of a person's actions to quantify what it is to "think globally." To lend meaning to the result, it introduces "order-of-magnitude" thinking. Three examples, on the global impact of a... (View More)

In the state of Maryland, a local politician once claimed that sea level is rising because there are too many people putting boats on the open ocean. Could that result in a significant sea level rise, perhaps even destroy low-lying nations such as... (View More)

Audience: High school
Materials Cost: Free per student