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Earth processes  
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Wave movement is explored using a metal tray of prepared gelatin, dominoes, sugar cubes, plastic wrap and a rubber mallet, in a demonstration of physical principles supporting the study of earthquakes. The resource is part of the teacher's guide... (View More)

In this activity, students create a reservoir model using hoses, a bucket, a flat pan, and water, to understand the inputs and outputs of a local watershed or reservoir. The resource is supported by teacher background information, assessment... (View More)

In this activity, students investigate the interacting parts of the Earth system by observing changes in evaporation rate in four small aquariums with different initial conditions. The demonstration requires 4 small aquariums, soil, plants, water,... (View More)

Slinky toys are used to demonstrate how primary (P) and secondary (S) waves travel in earthquakes. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Shaky Quake. Lesson objectives supported by the... (View More)

In this demonstration, students learn about the physical process of liquification and how it causes the ground to become unstable during an earthquake. Required materials include a plastic tub, sand, water, a brick and a rubber mallet. The resource... (View More)

This demonstration shows that an increase in temperature will speed up the water cycle. One outcome will be an increase in rainfall. A second outcome will be the increase in total evaporation of water and subsequent drought. Materials required... (View More)

This demonstration will show how increased temperatures will hasten the melting of ice in the environment, contributing to a rise in sea level and subsequent flooding of coastal areas. Materials required include 2 aquariums, plastic wrap, a clamp... (View More)

In this demonstration, students explore the concept of greenhouse warming. They determine whether an increase in the amount of heat-trappping gases in the atmosphere can cause the temperature on Earth to rise. Students compare the relative heat... (View More)

Students investigate whether global climate change will intensify the effects of hurricanes on coastal communities by determining the areas most vulnerable to hurricane surges by using topographic maps, a physical model, and a time series of... (View More)

Students build a simple aneroid barometer that can be used to measure changes in air pressure. Materials required include a large jar, ruler, large balloon, 2 drinking straws, and clay. The instrument is used to track changes in air pressure, and... (View More)